Islamic Police Arrest 11 in Nigeria for Breaking Ramadan Fast

This exemption aligns with the principles of religious tolerance in Nigeria. Upon arrest, the offenders were released after swearing an oath promising not to repeat the offence. Additionally, they pledged to observe the fast diligently from that point forward

In a recent development in Nigeria’s northern state of Kano, the Islamic police, known as Hisbah, have made headlines yet again by arresting 11 Muslims for breaking the Ramadan fast.

This enforcement action underscores the strict adherence to Islamic law, or Sharia, which operates alongside secular law in the region.

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Kano, with its majority Muslim population, witnesses heightened vigilance during Ramadan, the holiest month in Islam.

Hisbah conducts regular searches of eateries and markets to ensure compliance with fasting regulations.

On Tuesday, their efforts led to the apprehension of 10 men and one woman who were found eating during daylight hours.

Lawal Fagge, the spokesman for Hisbah, confirmed the arrests, stating that the individuals were caught red-handed, with some even consuming food from their businesses.

Fagge emphasized that the enforcement activities would persist throughout Ramadan, focusing primarily on areas with bustling market activities.

However, Fagge clarified that non-Muslims are exempt from such scrutiny unless they are found to be intentionally supplying food to Muslims during fasting hours.

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This exemption aligns with the principles of religious tolerance in Nigeria. Upon arrest, the offenders were released after swearing an oath promising not to repeat the offence. Additionally, they pledged to observe the fast diligently from that point forward.

In some cases, Hisbah officials sought the involvement of the arrestees’ relatives or guardians to ensure compliance.

The enforcement of Sharia alongside secular law traces back over two decades when it was introduced in 12 northern Nigerian states with predominantly Muslim populations.

Ramadan holds immense significance for Muslims worldwide as it commemorates the revelation of the first verses of the Quran to Prophet Muhammad.

Fasting during Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, symbolizing self-discipline, spiritual reflection, and empathy for the less fortunate.

Observers abstain from food, drink, smoking, and other physical needs from dawn until sunset. This year, Ramadan began on March 11th and is expected to conclude on April 9th, lasting 30 days.

The actions of Hisbah in Kano highlight the complexities of governance and law enforcement in regions where religious and secular authorities coexist.

While the arrests may seem stringent to some, they reflect the commitment to upholding religious traditions and values.

As Ramadan progresses, communities in Kano and across Nigeria will continue to navigate the delicate balance between religious observance and individual freedoms under the watchful eye of Hisbah and other religious authorities.

 

This article was created using automation technology and was thoroughly edited and fact-checked by one of our editorial staff members

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