NASA's Hubble telescope: Does it work like a phone lens?

Every time NASA posts photos from space on Twitter or Instagram and explains their content, many people in the comments ask how the photos were taken, the colors are real, and most importantly, they ask about the lens that Hubble Telescope consists of. They often receive this question, so they want to explain it to space enthusiasts. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope does not take pictures at first, it captures the wavelength and restores the color of the photos taken by the phone camera.

NASA stated that the Hubble camera takes pictures of various wavelengths reaching the earth in grayscale, and then scientists combine pictures by using different color filters on the telescope and assign each color filter a wavelength and wavelength color to create color images. The image corresponds to the combination.

The space agency stated that many of the full-color photos shared by Hubble were created by combining three individually exposed photos, one each in red, green, and blue light. “By mixing these three colors, you can reproduce almost any color visible to the human eye,” NASA said in a statement. “Just like TVs, computer monitors, and cameras create colors to display images!”

NASA said that scientists are using the closest ultraviolet and infrared spectra in the visible light spectrum to present this information. The agency said it is doing so because we can’t see the colors in the ultraviolet and infrared spectrum. He said that the colors in Hubble’s images are used to highlight the interesting features of the celestial body under study, and the agency then explained it with an example.

NASA released an image of a ring nebula and reported that the dark blue in the center (displayed under visible light) represents helium, the inner ring (displayed as blue) is the glow of hydrogen and oxygen, and the reddish outer ring, Nitrogen, and Sulfur, create an image taken by NASA’s Hubble Telescope.

One of the pictures shows a three-armed spiral galaxy. NASA added in the title: “The first image after the Hubble team successfully fixed the faulty equipment on the telescope, the observatory resumed work over the weekend and took pictures of these galaxies.”

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By Ellen Packer

A news media professional with a strong experience in online journalism, content management and social media. Ellen’s strength includes the sound knowledge of online media, detecting potential trend worthy subjects, discovering news and proficiency in packaging content for web and mobile.

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